Moderators and Panelists
Moderators
  • Professor Stephen ANDREWS
    Honarary Professor
    Faculty of Education
    The University of Hong Kong
    Hong Kong, China

    Honorary Professor
    Faculty of Education
    The University of Hong Kong
    Hong Kong, China

    BiographyStephen Andrews is Honorary Professor in English Language Education and former Dean of the Faculty of Education, University of Hong Kong, where he has worked since 1990. Before coming to Hong Kong, he was Head of the TEFL Unit at what is now Cambridge ESOL. He has also worked at the University of Reading, as well as in Thailand, Sudan, Egypt, Mexico, Switzerland, Germany and France. His research and publications mainly concern second language education, particularly the language awareness of L2 teachers, and the impact of assessment on teaching and learning. He has published a number of international journal articles and book chapters, and he is the author of the 2007 Cambridge University Press book Teacher Language Awareness.

  • Professor Tania BROADLEY
    Assistant Dean (Teaching & Learning)
    Faculty of Education
    Queensland University of Technology
    Australia

    Assistant Dean (Teaching & Learning)
    Faculty of Education
    Queensland University of Technology
    Australia

    BiographyTania Broadley is Assistant Dean (Teaching and Learning) and Professor in the Faculty of Education at Queensland University of Technology. Tania provides strategic leadership and is responsible for the quality of design and implementation of undergraduate and postgraduate courses. She works closely with stakeholders within the Faculty, the wider University and with industry partners to ensure courses are meeting regulatory requirements and providing high quality, classroom and school ready graduates for the sector. Tania previously worked for the Deputy Vice Chancellor (Academic) at Curtin University to establish an institute of academic development and enhance student learning through innovative teaching and technology. Tania continues to conduct research into Teacher Education, which follows on from her background as Lecturer in Educational Technology.

  • Professor Catherine Ka Ki CHAN
    Professor
    Division of Policy, Administration and Social Sciences Education
    Faculty of Education
    The University of Hong Kong
    Hong Kong, China

    Professor
    Division of Policy, Administration and Social Sciences Education
    Faculty of Education
    The University of Hong Kong
    Hong Kong, China

    BiographyProfessor Chan has re-joined the Faculty of Education, The University of Hong Kong as Professor of Practice after serving as Deputy Secretary and Principal Assistant Secretary of the Education Bureau, Hong Kong SAR, China for eighteen years. Benefiting from the experiences of Associate Professor before, she has put theories into practice in policy-making, implementation and evaluation. She has led Hong Kong’s curriculum reform that started in 2002, co-ordinated the implementation of the New Academic Structure at senior secondary level and interface with higher education, innovated support strategies by partnering with various stakeholders, and communicated the articulation of study pathways in Hong Kong, the Mainland and overseas. She aspires to conceptualise and reflect on the experiences, to enrich the teaching profession, to inform and catalyze research, and to facilitate knowledge sharing and transfer beyond boundaries.

  • Professor Sarah GRAVETT
    Dean
    Faculty of Education
    University of Johannesburg
    South Africa

    Dean
    Faculty of Education
    University of Johannesburg
    South Africa

    BiographySarah Gravett is dean of the Faculty of Education at the University of Johannesburg (UJ). Her initial postdoctoral research included transformative learning, dialogic teaching and the design of learning environments in higher education. In recent years her research focus has shifted to teacher education. She views her involvement in founding a school at UJ’s Soweto campus as the most gratifying achievement of her academic career. The school was established to serve the education needs of young children in close proximity to the UJ Soweto campus, to serve as a learning site for the education of teachers and as an education laboratory.

  • Professor Jari LAVONEN
    Head
    Department of Teacher Education
    Faculty of Educational Sciences
    University of Helsinki
    Finland

    Head
    Department of Teacher Education
    Faculty of Educational Sciences
    University of Helsinki
    Finland

    BiographyJari Lavonen is a professor of science education (2003-) in the Department of Education, University of Helsinki, Finland. He was the director of the department 2009-2017. He has been a director (PI) of 18 research projects with external research funding, and he has supervised 20 PhD theses. He has published 200 refereed scientific papers in various journals and books, 150 other articles and wrote 180 books for science teacher education and science education. He has taught courses on teaching and assessment in and in teacher education. He has been working in many national level committees and steering committees at the ministry and university level. He is currently working as a chair for national teacher education forum at the Finnish Ministry of Education.

  • Professor LOW Ee Ling
    Professor
    Chief Planning Officer
    Director’s Office
    National Institute of Education
    Nanyang Technological University
    Singapore

    Professor
    Chief Planning Officer
    Director’s Office
    National Institute of Education
    Nanyang Technological University
    Singapore

    BiographyProfessor Ee-Ling Low is the Chief Planning Officer, Director’s Office at the National Institute of Education, Nanyang Technological University, Singapore. She played a leading role in the conceptualization of the NIE Strategic roadmap: towards 2017 and the development of the Teacher education for the 21st century (TE21) model. She has recently published a book titled “Empowered Educators in Singapore: How High-Performing Systems Shape Teaching Quality” co-authored with Professor A. Lin Goodwin and Professor Linda Darling-Hammond. She is Singapore’s representative on the Stanford University International Teacher Policy Study, the Harvard Graduate School of Education’s Global Education Innovation Initiative and the OECD Education 2030 initiative.

  • Professor Lily ORLAND-BARAK
    Dean of Graduate Studies and
    Professor
    Faculty of Education
    University of Haifa
    Israel

    Dean of Graduate Studies and
    Professor
    Faculty of Education
    University of Haifa
    Israel

    BiographyLily Orland-Barak is Professor in Education, former Dean of the Fcaulty of Education and present Dean of Graduate Studies at the University of Haifa, Israel. Her research focuses on professional learning, mentoring and curriculum development in the context of teacher education. She has published numerous articles and books on these topics, and serves on national and international academic committees and editorial boards.

  • Mrs Judith SHULMAN
    Senior Research Associate Emerita
    WestEd
    USA

    Senior Research Associate Emerita
    WestEd
    USA

    BiographyJudy Shulman served for 25 years as a Senior Research Associate at WestEd, an educational organization in San Francisco engaged in applied research and development. Previously, she was an elementary school teacher and an instructor at Michigan State University teaching and supervising student teachers.

    Judy’s research and practice focuses on improving teacher education and teacher learning. Shulman pioneered the development and use of practitioner-written casebooks and multi-media cases as professional development tools. She is the senior editor of seven casebooks. In recognition for this work, Shulman received the American Educational Research Association’s annual award for Relating Research to Practice.

Panelists
  • Professor Tania BROADLEY
    Assistant Dean (Teaching & Learning)
    Faculty of Education
    Queensland University of Technology
    Australia

    Assistant Dean (Teaching & Learning)
    Faculty of Education
    Queensland University of Technology
    Australia

    BiographyTania Broadley is Assistant Dean (Teaching and Learning) and Professor in the Faculty of Education at Queensland University of Technology. Tania provides strategic leadership and is responsible for the quality of design and implementation of undergraduate and postgraduate courses. She works closely with stakeholders within the Faculty, the wider University and with industry partners to ensure courses are meeting regulatory requirements and providing high quality, classroom and school ready graduates for the sector. Tania previously worked for the Deputy Vice Chancellor (Academic) at Curtin University to establish an institute of academic development and enhance student learning through innovative teaching and technology. Tania continues to conduct research into Teacher Education, which follows on from her background as Lecturer in Educational Technology.

    AbstractTitle: Imagining Change Agents and Problem Solvers: Unpacking the Australian Reform Agenda Context
    Imagine if the rhetoric surrounding international education reform agendas could shift from one of measuring quality and impact through standardised testing; to measuring teaching performance through change agent characteristics and a students’ ability to solve complex real-world problems. Since 2000, there has been a steady decline in Australian students’ performance on international and national standardised tests. This growing concern has led to an increased focus on teachers’ effectiveness. Through a recent Ministerial Advisory Group report and the national regulation of teacher education preparation programs, there is now a requirement for providers to assess all pre-service teachers through a Teaching Performance Assessment (TPA) as a way of identifying their readiness to commence teaching in the classroom as a condition of graduation. This paper will discuss the changing nature of teachers work in relation to progressive education systems, research focused on building resilience in pre-service teachers and a new endeavor to evaluate the implementation of TPA’s into the Australian context.

  • Dr Cheri CHAN
    Assistant Professor
    Division of English Language Education
    Faculty of Education
    The University of Hong Kong
    Hong Kong, China

    Assistant Professor
    Division of English Language Education
    Faculty of Education
    The University of Hong Kong
    Hong Kong, China

    BiographyCheri Chan is an Assistant Professor in the Faculty of Education (Division of English Language Education), The University of Hong Kong. She currently teaches a wide range of courses for the Faculty’s undergraduate and postgraduate programmes. Cheri is interested in teacher education research. In particular, her studies draw on critical social theories to understand the complexities of how second language teachers learn together as professionals. Her areas of research include teacher mentoring, collaboration in education and language teacher identities. Cheri works closely with many ESL teachers in the Hong Kong community through different school-university partnership projects.

    AbstractTitle: Mentoring in The Third Space: Rethinking Collaborative Learning for Pre-service and In-service Teachers in New Times

    Author: Dr Cheri Chan, The University of Hong Kong

    Traditional models of school-based mentoring which involve a dyadic mentoring relationship can be problematic because they may be rooted in collegial control, thus limiting the scope for teacher candidates to have open reflective dialogues as professional equals with their mentors. This paper reports on a qualitative study examining how collaborative professional learning emerged when pre-service and in-service English language teachers from a teacher education programme engaged in professional conversations in a virtual third space. Online mentoring conversations were analysed and theorised using sociocultural theories of learning. It was found that the blurring and/or breaking of institutional boundaries led to a more secure sense of self, thus generating more productive critical conversations about the complexities of teaching English as a second language (ESL) in Hong Kong classrooms. Implications for virtual mentoring to help prospective teachers interrogate tensions arising from integrating theories into practice will be discussed.

    Title: Enacting Pedagogical Content Knowledge: integration of theory and practice

    Co-authors: Dr Cheri Chan, Dr Joseph Lam, Professor Amy B.M. Tsui, Professor Carol Chan & Dr Susan Bridges, The University of Hong Kong

    This paper reports on an attempt to address the longstanding disconnect between theory and practice in initial teacher education through a reform of a postgraduate initial teacher education programme which aims to provide a coherent learning experience for student teachers. It focuses specifically on the integration of the education foundation courses and the methodology courses through co-planning and co-teaching between the tutors in the hitherto separated domains. The integration process has been guided by the concept of pedagogical content knowledge and its centrality in teachers’ work. The implementation process afforded the opportunity for the teams to interrogate the concept and come to a renewed understanding of what it should be. Data from two Collaborative Lesson Inquiry Courses, co-planned and co-taught by the Chinese and English methods tutors and the-then education foundation tutors will be presented for illustration.

  • Dr Kennedy CHAN
    Assistant Professor
    Division of Mathematics and Science Education
    Faculty of Education
    The University of Hong Kong
    Hong Kong, China

    Assistant Professor
    Division of Mathematics and Science Education
    Faculty of Education
    The University of Hong Kong
    Hong Kong, China

    BiographyKennedy Kam Ho Chan is an assistant professor at the University of Hong Kong (HKU). He received his B.Sc. and M.Phil. degrees in science from HKU. Before pursuing his Ph.D. studies at the same university, he worked as a secondary school science teacher in several local secondary schools. His research interests include pedagogical content knowledge (PCK), teacher noticing, using videos to promote teacher learning and formative assessment. He was an invited participant of PCK Summit II held in the Netherlands.

    AbstractTitle: How is science teachers’ pedagogical content knowledge investigated in empirical studies?
    Pedagogical content knowledge (PCK) is widely used as a theoretical lens for researching the professional knowledge of science teachers. The divergent views in understanding and interpreting PCK have led to diverse ways of investigating and determining science teachers’ PCK. This article aims to organise, integrate and synthesise empirical studies on science teachers’ PCK to provide an overview of how science teachers’ PCK is being investigated within the science education community. The systematic review suggests that the field has paid much less attention to the PCK manifested in teacher actions and the more dynamic form of PCK which informs science teachers teaching decisions/action in the interactive phase of teaching. The findings call for more research effort on these variants of PCK to better understand the processes science teachers employ when confronted with the challenges of teaching particular subject matter.

  • Dr Benjamin Johnson CHANG
    Assistant Professor
    Department of Curriculum and Instruction
    Faculty of Education and Human Development
    The Education University of Hong Kong...

    Assistant Professor
    Department of Curriculum and Instruction
    Faculty of Education and Human Development
    The Education University of Hong Kong
    Hong Kong, China

    BiographyBenjamin “Benji” Chang is an Assistant Professor in the Department of Curriculum & Instruction at the Education University of Hong Kong. Dr. Chang received his Ph.D. at the University of California, Los Angeles, and completed a Postdoctoral Fellowship at Teachers College, Columbia University. Utilizing critical and sociocultural approaches to pedagogy, literacy, teacher education and social movements, Dr. Chang’s work focuses on issues of agency and sustainability for marginalized groups in education for social justice. He recently won three consecutive awards for teaching at EdUHK and has been a visiting scholar to the Queensland University of Technology and Beijing Normal University.

    AbstractTitle: Critical and Sociocultural Practices Towards a Higher Education Pipeline in Hong Kong: Issues of Agency, Sustainability, and Internationalization Within Teacher Education and Research Training
    This paper explores the integration of critical pedagogy and sociocultural learning in developing more engaging and rigorous teacher education practices for institutions that are looking to advance their ‘international standards’ in education for the shorter and longer term. The context is a program in Hong Kong that helps develop diverse undergraduates, often the first in their family to attend university, to be more effective teachers and researchers and be concerned with addressing social justice issues in their work and everyday lives. This paper discusses what can be called an educational pipeline that begins with early undergraduates and then branches off into teaching, postgraduate studies, and research. In examining this process, the paper discusses sustainable contributions that can be made when the pipeline is grounded in methodologies which help to reframe what is considered teacher and student knowledge, and promote a teacher education praxis towards greater agency, equity, and a more humanizing education.

  • Professor CHEN Xiangming
    Professor and
    Director of Center for Qualitative Research in Education
    Graduate School of Education
    Peking University
    China

    Professor and
    Director of Center for Qualitative Research in Education
    Graduate School of Education
    Peking University
    China

    BiographyProf. Xiangming Chen is Chair of Academic Committee at Graduate School of Education, and Director of Center for Qualitative Research in Education, Peking University, China. She obtained B.A. in Human Normal University, M.A. from Beijing Normal University, and M.Ed. and Ed. D. from Harvard University. She was a visiting professor in Oxford University, Nagoya University, National Institute of Education in Singapore, etc. Her major research areas include teacher education, teaching & learning and qualitative research methodology. She has been team leader for more than 10 national and international research and development projects, and has published 15 books (including editing) and over 180 articles.

    AbstractTitle: Advocating an Ethical Turn in the Study of Teacher Practical Knowledge
    Previous studies concerning teacher practical knowledge have revealed its epistemological foundations, content structure, and research methodology, while few examine its ethical dimension. Based on a four-year project in China, this study probes the ethical dimension of an experienced teacher’s practical knowledge, explicated in a dilemmatic but teachable moment. Narrative inquiry is used to reveal the teacher’s ethical decisions and actions in the nested macro-meso-micro dilemmatic spaces. It is found that the teacher’s practical knowledge is embedded in a complicated web of meanings, and tapestried by her compromise to the national policies, her negotiation with the school governance, and her caring for her students of diverse backgrounds. The ethical dimension of her practical knowledge provides her a vital power to carry out her educative practice. Thus, it is advocated that an ‘ethical turn’ for research in teacher practical knowledge is needed, so as to authorize teachers’ professionality reflected in their roles as humanity cultivators and transformative intellectuals.

  • Ms Kathryn COFF
    Nalderun Coordinator
    Castlemaine District Community Health
    Australia

    Nalderun Coordinator
    Castlemaine District Community Health
    Australia

    BiographyKathryn Coff is a very proud Aboriginal woman who is a respected member of her community. She manages Nalderun Aboriginal Services where they support and are in partnerships with many organisations, schools and the local university and technical college.
    Recently Kathryn was awarded an Emerging Leader Award in Victoria, Australia by the Indigenous Fellowship for Leadership because of her tireless work to establish and develop numerous key programs. She also writes curriculum and resources for schools. Kathryn believes most effective way of ‘Closing the Gap’ between Aboriginal Students and others, is engaging students to learn through Community, Culture and Country. For 26 years she has worked with children and families who are vulnerable and disadvantaged.

    AbstractTitle: Nothing about us without us: Community-engaged teacher education

    Co-authors: Kathryn Coff, Nalderun Upper Loddon Dja Dja Warrung Community and Jo Lampert, School of Education, La Trobe University

    In a recent workshop at a flexi-school in Melbourne, Australia, a group of young people were asked the provocative question, ‘What sucks and how can we fix it?’. What sucked, they said, were things like racism and sexism; feeling depressed; ridiculous, outdated laws and not being listened to by teachers who knew nothing about them or their lives. At another meeting, Principals were asked if they could arrange for some parents to attend an after-school meeting with a local politician. The Principal looked down, murmuring “parents don’t come here too much. We’re not the kind of school where parents care about their kids’ education”.

    In this paper, I argue that learning better ways to engage schools with students and communities is the biggest issue for teaching and teacher education. The saying ‘nothing about us without us’ poses a reminder to educators that community should always have an audible voice at the table, in central, rather than tokenistic ways.

  • Professor Bronwen COWIE
    Director
    Wilf Malcolm Institute of Educational Research
    Faculty of Education
    The University of Waikato
    New Zealand

    Director
    Wilf Malcolm Institute of Educational Research
    Faculty of Education
    The University of Waikato
    New Zealand

    BiographyProfessor Bronwen Cowie is Director of the Wilf Malcolm Institute of Educational Research, The University of Waikato, New Zealand. Bronwen’s particular interests are in learning and assessment. Her research has highlighted that assessment for learning is embedded in and accomplished through a combination of classroom interaction and planned activities. Working with teachers she has explored the role teacher understanding of curriculum and disciplines and of teacher noticing and attention to students’ diverse funds of knowledge plays in teachers being able to recognise and guide student learning as it emerges.

    AbstractTitle: Teacher knowledge for Informal Assessment for Learning
    Assessment for learning usefully combines both planned activities and teacher interaction with students during their learning. Typically planned activities converge on curriculum learning outcomes. On the other hand, teacher ‘on the fly’ assessment for learning that is both rigorous and responsive to student needs and strengths is more divergent. More than planned activities it relies on a dynamic meld of teacher connoisseurship of the curriculum (understanding of disciplinary concepts and epistemological foundations and what it means to learn to learn), teacher capacity to make and leverage cultural connections, and understanding of learning as a collaborative activity and shared responsibility. This contribution will discuss the interaction of these aspects with an emphasis on how, in science education at least, the current expansion in the focus for student learning outcomes brings with it the potential to both challenge and assist teacher enactment of assessment for learning.

  • Dr Fiona ELL
    Associate Dean
    Head of Initial Teacher Education
    Faculty of Education and Social Work
    University of Auckland
    New Zealand

    Associate Dean
    Head of Initial Teacher Education
    Faculty of Education and Social Work
    University of Auckland
    New Zealand

    BiographyFiona Ell is Associate Dean and Head of Teacher Education in the Faculty of Education and Social Work at the University of Auckland. She began her career as a primary school teacher before moving into teacher education and research. Fiona is involved in national and international research projects that are investigating different elements of how new understandings, ideas and attitudes are developed and adopted by teachers and teacher candidates, with a particular focus on developing teaching for equity. She is a member of the executive of TEFANZ, New Zealand’s teacher educator organisation and an expert panel member for AITSL’s teacher performance assessment monitoring in Australia.

    AbstractTitle: The limits of our imagination: the present, the past and policy in teacher preparation programme design in Aotearoa/New Zealand
    In 2013 the New Zealand Government called for tenders for New Zealand’s first post-graduate teacher preparation programmes. Proposed as three-year pilots, given additional per head funding and capped student numbers, the programmes were termed ‘exemplary’. In the tender process, new programmes were required to focus on ‘priority learners’ – those who were underserved by the current system. Five years later the programmes have been extended for a limited time, and face an uncertain future in a confused policy landscape. This paper examines what types of programme emerged from this opportunity to ‘reimagine’, how they were informed by international research and practice and by local imperatives, and how they are shaped by the history of teacher education in New Zealand, our current education landscape and policy change. It poses the questions: how are our imaginations limited by our past and our context and can (or should) we free ourselves from these constraints?

  • Professor A. Lin GOODWIN
    Dean
    Faculty of Education
    The University of Hong Kong
    Hong Kong, China

    Dean
    Faculty of Education
    The University of Hong Kong
    Hong Kong, China

    BiographyA. Lin Goodwin is Dean of the Faculty of Education at The University of Hong Kong, and holds the Evenden Foundation Chair at Teachers College, Columbia University. Her research focuses on teacher and teacher educator identities and development; multicultural understandings and curriculum enactments; the particular issues facing Asian/Asian American teachers and students in U.S. schools; and on international analyses/comparisons of teacher education practice and policy.

    AbstractTitle: Recruiting & Preparing Quality Teachers for All Students: Lessons from a New York City Teacher Residency Programme

    Co-authors: A. Lin Goodwin, The University of Hong Kong, Rachel Roegman, University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign, and Emilie M. Reagan, University of New Hampshire

    Teacher residencies are emerging as one innovative model in the U.S. for the instruction of teachers prepared for the new social reality of schools in specific contexts. In this paper, we draw on our experiences with one residency programme in New York City (NYC) to illustrate how this model responds to critical issues facing the profession. We highlight the ways in which this program recruits, selects, and prepares the next generation of teachers to be pedagogically wise and serve diverse learners well. Specifically, we discuss 1) recruiting for both quality and diversity; 2) quality teacher preparation within a community of practice; and 3) curricular stances for preparing teachers who can teach all children. We conclude with lessons learned that could have implications for teacher preparation not just in the U.S., but elsewhere in the world.

  • Professor Sarah GRAVETT
    Dean
    Faculty of Education
    University of Johannesburg
    South Africa

    Dean
    Faculty of Education
    University of Johannesburg
    South Africa

    BiographySarah Gravett is dean of the Faculty of Education at the University of Johannesburg (UJ). Her initial postdoctoral research included transformative learning, dialogic teaching and the design of learning environments in higher education. In recent years her research focus has shifted to teacher education. She views her involvement in founding a school at UJ’s Soweto campus as the most gratifying achievement of her academic career. The school was established to serve the education needs of young children in close proximity to the UJ Soweto campus, to serve as a learning site for the education of teachers and as an education laboratory.

    AbstractTitle: Integrating coursework and practice learning in a teacher education programme at the University of Johannesburg in South Africa

    Co-authors: Sarah Gravett and Nadine Petersen

    The teacher education programme for foundation phase (elementary school) teachers at the University of Johannesburg’s Soweto Campus is highly regarded in South Africa and was endorsed in 2016 by an international panel of teacher education experts. The programme was designed to operate in conjunction with a primary school, which serves an education laboratory. A central design principle of the programme is the ‘developing child’. Student teachers’ observation tasks emanating from coursework involve a close study of the learning and development of the pupils. Each student teacher is assigned one child for in-depth study over a period of four years while also observing the whole class. We reasoned that their prolonged involvement with the same children would support the development of “pedagogical learner knowledge” (MacKinnon, 1992 as cited in Darling-Hammond, 2006). Our research shows that this is indeed materializing. Informed by the success of the initial work, and realizing the potential that the focus on ‘child study’ has to develop research-oriented teachers, the tasks have been reconceptualised and expanded as a longitudinal research project, spread over the whole programme. This implies teaching student teachers how to be an education researcher from the onset of their studies.

  • Dr Gary HARFITT
    Associate Dean (Learning & Teaching)
    Associate Professor
    Division of English Language Education
    Faculty of Education
    The University of Hong Kong
    Hong Kong, China

    Associate Dean (Learning & Teaching)
    Associate Professor
    Division of English Language Education
    Faculty of Education
    The University of Hong Kong
    Hong Kong, China

    BiographyGary Harfitt is the Associate Dean for Learning and Teaching at the Faculty of Education, The University of Hong Kong. Since 2015 he has also overseen the introduction of experiential learning into teacher training programmes at undergraduate and postgraduate levels in the Faculty. His research interests include good practices in English Language teaching, pupil voice, small class teaching and the impact of class size reduction on students’ learning as well as the issue of early career teachers’ lives and experience.

    AbstractTitle: Exploring alternative paths to becoming a teacher: the role of the community in teacher preparation
    Viewing learning as a social and cultural process this paper argues that learner teachers’ developing expertise should not only reside in the knowledge domains typically established by universities and schools. A crucial knowledge domain that is too often overlooked by schools and teacher education institutes is the wider community beyond the walls of the classroom and lecture hall. This paper outlines the establishment of a mandatory experiential learning (EL) block across multiple subject disciplines on teacher preparation programmes at undergraduate and postgraduate levels. This challenging curriculum initiative in teacher training has enabled a powerful synergy between the core functions of our teacher-training faculty and the wider community. The paper will also demonstrate how community partners such as non-governmental organisations (NGOs) can play a highly significant role in the development of beginning teachers and how they might even be seen as ‘co-educators’ in the process of teacher preparation.

  • Professor Markku JAHNUKAINEN
    Professor
    Faculty of Educational Sciences
    University of Helsinki
    Finland

    Professor
    Faculty of Educational Sciences
    University of Helsinki
    Finland

    BiographyDr. Markku Jahnukainen is Professor of Special Education at the Faculty of Educational Sciences in University of Helsinki, Finland. He is also Adjunct Professor at the University of Alberta, Canada and served as Visiting Professor in Comparative and International Inclusive Education Research in Humboldt University Berlin, Germany 2013-14. His recent publications are related to comparative education research in inclusive education as well as to longitudinal research on young people in vulnerable life situations. Dr. Jahnukainen is the past President of the Finnish Educational Research Association FERA (2012-2015).

    AbstractTitle: Keys to Equity: (Special) Teachers Serving Every Student in Finland
    The Finnish ‘Education for All’ approach has developed during the decades and currently every student is served in the same comprehensive school system. Finnish public school is well-known about the high equity and narrow standard deviation in terms of student performance. One key ingredient of equity is the broad variety of additional supports delivered under the Learning and Schooling Support system. Special teachers play an important role in this system as consultants, co-teachers and educators specialized in learning and behavior support and student welfare. Every school in Finland do have at least one special teacher working with the whole student population. In teacher education, these special teachers do have own route, however the collaboration with other teacher students starts during undergraduate studies sharing same basic studies in educational science. This presentation gives an overview on Learning and Schooling Support system and on the special teachers’ work roles.

    Literature:
    Jahnukainen, M. & Itkonen, T. 2016. ”Tiered Intervention: History and Trends in Finland and the United States”. European Journal of Special Needs Education 31 (1), 140-150. doi: 10.1080/08856257.2015.1108042

    Jahnukainen, M. 2015. “Inclusion, Integration, or What? A Comparative Study of the School Principals’ Perceptions of Inclusive and Special Education in Finland and in Alberta, Canada.” Disability & Society 30 (1): 59–72. doi:10.1080/09687599.2014.982788.

    Pulkkinen J., & M. Jahnukainen. 2016. “Finnish Reform of the Funding and Provision of Special Education: The Views of Principals and Municipal Education Administrators.” Educational Review 68 (2), 171–188. doi: 10.1080/00131911.2015.1060586.

    Graham, L. J., and M. Jahnukainen. 2011. “Wherefore Art Thou, Inclusion? Analysing the Development of Inclusive Education in New South Wales, Alberta and Finland.” Journal of Education Policy 26 (2): 263–288. doi:10.1080/02680939.2010.493230.

  • Professor Leena KROKFORS
    Vice Dean, Academic and International Affairs
    Professor
    Faculty of Educational Sciences
    University of Helsinki
    Finland

    Vice Dean, Academic and International Affairs
    Professor
    Faculty of Educational Sciences
    University of Helsinki
    Finland

    BiographyDr. Leena Krokfors is a Professor of Teacher Education in the Faculty of Behavioral Sciences at the University of Helsinki. She leads the Curriculum Theory and Learning Environment Research Group. Her research interests are in the paradigms of teacher education, especially the theory and curriculum of research-based teacher education, teachers’ pedagogical thinking and reflective learning. Recently, her research work has concentrated on methodological questions in the analysis of formal education and informal learning, collaborative interaction and social knowledge creation in multimedia-enriched learning environments and the use of digital video technology in educational settings.

    In sum, Professor Krokfors has a strong record in pursuing internationally recognized research in the areas of teacher education and school pedagogy with a focus on (a) research based teacher education and teachers’ pedagogical thinking and learning; (b) new models of academic professional education and learning; (c) sociocultural approaches to design, use, and evaluation of physical and virtual learning environments and media in education.

    AbstractTitle: Finnish Teacher Education Curriculum Reform – Foundations, Vision, Goals and Structures of the Reform
    Teacher education curriculum is under a big reform in Finland. The new curriculum at the University of Helsinki takes effect on August 2017. This paper studies the foundations, vision, goals and structure of the curriculum after the reform. Research-based teacher education was chosen as the organizing theme for over 40 years ago and after the reform is still strongly relied on. But teachers’ profession is in change and new professional understanding fostering 21th century learning is needed. Future teachers work together as teams and are leaders of multi-professional collaboration. This requires new leadership and curriculum related skills, understanding of the digital pedagogy and new learning environments, which are now provided in the reformed new curricula.

  • Dr Hiroyuki KUNO
    Associate Professor
    Department of Educational Studies
    Graduate School of Education and Human Development
    Nagoya University
    Japan

    Associate Professor
    Department of Educational Studies
    Graduate School of Education and Human Development
    Nagoya University
    Japan

    BiographyHiroyuki Kuno is associate professor in the Graduate School of Education and Human Development at Nagoya University, Japan. His areas of expertise include curriculum development for teachers’ professional development and student learning, and lesson and school improvement through Lesson Study. He has been an Executive Committee member of the World Association of Lesson Studies and chaired the WALS 2017 international conference in Nagoya. He was visiting fellow at Cambridge University in 2013 and University of Education Heidelberg, Germany in 2017. Recent international publications include: Yamasaki, Y. and Kuno, H (ed.) (2017), Educational Progressivism, Cultural Encounters and Reform in Japan, Routledge.

    AbstractTitle: Lesson Study as an Effective Element for Curriculum Implementation and Innovation
    This paper tries to discuss curriculum innovation and implication through Lesson Study as an effective model for improvement curriculum within school. Emphasis is placed here on 1) competency based curriculum approach that focuses on students’ competencies such as ability of problem solving, communication and collaboration skills, and 2) the Integrated Studies Period introduced in 1998 in Japanese national curriculum and required teachers to develop localized curriculum which has been involved local context and contents. Teachers are empowered to overcome to new conceptualized curriculum through Lesson Study.

    For this purpose three aspects are identified: a) improving teachers’ pedagogical content knowledge, b) promoting learning community, and c) expanding practical research in school and encouraging teachers as researcher. Lesson study has been ‘discovered’ and ‘applied’ by these interrelated contexts of practical research. It focuses on ‘student learning’ rather than ‘teacher teaching’ and prefers ‘research in practice’ rather than ‘research on practice’.

    Keywords: Lesson Study, Curriculum Design & Implementation, Integrated Learning

  • Dr LAM Wai Ip Joseph
    Associate Professor
    Division of Chinese Language and Literature
    Faculty of Education
    The University of Hong Kong
    Hong Kong, China

    Associate Professor
    Division of Chinese Language and Literature
    Faculty of Education
    The University of Hong Kong
    Hong Kong, China

    BiographyWai Ip Joseph Lam is Associate Professor in Faculty of Education at The University of Hong Kong, where he teaches postgraduate courses in pedagogy for teaching Chinese, reading, discourse analysis, and critical discussion. He has taught Chinese language at secondary level in Hong Kong. He is also currently Director of Centre for Advancement of Chinese Language Education and Research (CACLER). His primary research interests focus on network analysis on Chinese language structure, reading, culturally and linguistically diverse students in Chinese language education in Hong Kong, and argumentation in discussion. He is author of more than 80 scholarly articles, chapters, monographs, and books on Chinese language education. His many current research projects include Supporting for Ethnic Minority Students in Local Kindergartens for Effective Learning of Chinese and Progress in International Reading Literacy Study (PIRLS).

    AbstractTitle: Enacting Pedagogical Content Knowledge: integration of theory and practice

    Co-authors: Dr Cheri Chan & Dr Joseph Lam, The University of Hong Kong

    This paper reports on an attempt to address the longstanding disconnect between theory and practice in initial teacher education through a reform of a postgraduate initial teacher education programme which aims to provide a coherent learning experience for student teachers. It focuses specifically on the integration of the education foundation courses and the methodology courses through co-planning and co-teaching between the tutors in the hitherto separated domains. The integration process has been guided by the concept of pedagogical content knowledge and its centrality in teachers’ work. The implementation process afforded the opportunity for the teams to interrogate the concept and come to a renewed understanding of what it should be. Data from two Collaborative Lesson Inquiry Courses, co-planned and co-taught by the Chinese and English methods tutors and the-then education foundation tutors will be presented for illustration.

  • Professor Jo LAMPERT
    Professor
    School of Education
    College of Arts, Social Sciences and Commerce (ASSC)
    La Trobe University
    Australia

    Professor
    School of Education
    College of Arts, Social Sciences and Commerce (ASSC)
    La Trobe University
    Australia

    BiographyDr. Jo Lampert is Professor of Education at La Trobe University in Melbourne, Australia and has a long history of teaching, publication and research in Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander education, social justice and teacher education for high-poverty schools. She is co-founder of Australia’s National Exceptional Teaching for Disadvantaged Schools program and Editor-in-Chief of the Oxford Research Encyclopedia of Teacher Education. Her current projects include community-engaged teacher education for urban, rural and remote hard-to-staff schools and addressing high attrition of teachers in hard-to-staff communities.

    AbstractTitle: Nothing about us without us: Community-engaged teacher education

    Co-authors: Kathryn Coff, Nalderun Upper Loddon Dja Dja Warrung Community and Jo Lampert, School of Education, La Trobe University

    In a recent workshop at a flexi-school in Melbourne, Australia, a group of young people were asked the provocative question, ‘What sucks and how can we fix it?’. What sucked, they said, were things like racism and sexism; feeling depressed; ridiculous, outdated laws and not being listened to by teachers who knew nothing about them or their lives. At another meeting, Principals were asked if they could arrange for some parents to attend an after-school meeting with a local politician. The Principal looked down, murmuring “parents don’t come here too much. We’re not the kind of school where parents care about their kids’ education”.

    In this paper, I argue that learning better ways to engage schools with students and communities is the biggest issue for teaching and teacher education. The saying ‘nothing about us without us’ poses a reminder to educators that community should always have an audible voice at the table, in central, rather than tokenistic ways.

  • Professor Jari LAVONEN
    Head
    Department of Teacher Education
    Faculty of Educational Sciences
    University of Helsinki
    Finland

    Head
    Department of Teacher Education
    Faculty of Educational Sciences
    University of Helsinki
    Finland

    BiographyJari Lavonen is a professor of science education (2003-) in the Department of Education, University of Helsinki, Finland. He was the director of the department 2009-2017. He has been a director (PI) of 18 research projects with external research funding, and he has supervised 20 PhD theses. He has published 200 refereed scientific papers in various journals and books, 150 other articles and wrote 180 books for science teacher education and science education. He has taught courses on teaching and assessment in and in teacher education. He has been working in many national level committees and steering committees at the ministry and university level. He is currently working as a chair for national teacher education forum at the Finnish Ministry of Education.

    AbstractTitle: Reimagining Finnish Teacher Education through a National Teacher Education Forum Work
    As a part of education related key projects in the current Finnish government programme, a Finnish Teacher Education Forum was established by the Ministry of Education in February 2016 aiming to foster the reimagining of teacher education as a part of national reform program. Altogether 100 experts from universities, schools, teacher union, municipality union and from the ministry of education and culture organised a literature review on the research on teachers and teacher education, benchmarked teacher education strategies in other countries and finally organized a national brainstorming. In the new teacher education strategy, published in October 2016, it is described teachers competence in three areas and what kind of teacher education and continuous professional development of teachers are necessary to ensure that teachers are able to support students in the classroom to learn the competencies (knowledge, skill and attitude) needed today, tomorrow and in future. The forum has supported teacher education institutes in spring and autumn 2017 through allocating 25 M€ for supporting the implementation of the aims of the development program.

  • Mr LEONG Kai Wah Cedric
    Master Teacher, English Language
    English Language Institute of Singapore
    Singapore

    Master Teacher, English Language
    English Language Institute of Singapore
    Singapore

    BiographyCedric is a Master Teacher with the English Language Institute of Singapore (ELIS). His teaching career began in 1988 and he was Head of the English Language and Literature departments in three secondary schools before his secondment to the National Institute of Education (NIE) in 2003. At NIE, he taught on the Post-graduate Diploma in Education programme and was selected to coordinate it. Prior to joining ELIS in 2015, Cedric was Senior Head for English Language and Literature in the Curriculum Planning & Development Division at the Ministry of Education, Singapore.

    AbstractTitle: Engendering a Culture of Collaborative Professional Learning
    While there is empirical evidence that the core of professional learning is collaboration, Michael Fullan (2006) and other researchers have made the case that, for professional learning to be effective and sustainable, it is not enough to put in place the structures for collaboration. Fullan argues that it is critical to also engender a collaborative culture that is focused on learning, not only in pockets of change in instructional practices within individual schools but also in professional interactions across schools in a system. In this paper, Cedric Leong will discuss the approach adopted by the English Language Institute of Singapore (ELIS) to promote teacher collaborative learning among English Language teacher leaders and teachers in Singapore schools. Cedric will also draw from his personal experience of facilitating in-situ teacher collaborative learning in two schools to highlight the opportunities and challenges in engendering a culture of collaborative professional learning among teachers.

  • Professor Marja-Kristiina LERKKANEN
    Professor
    Department of Teacher Education
    Faculty of Education and Psychology
    University of Jyväskylä
    Finland

    Professor
    Department of Teacher Education
    Faculty of Education and Psychology
    University of Jyväskylä
    Finland

    BiographyMarja-Kristiina Lerkkanen is a Professor of Education at the University of Jyväskylä, Finland, and Visiting Professor at the University of Stavanger, Norway. Her outstanding writing awards include the award from European Association for Research on Learning and Instruction, as well as award from International Reading Association. She has been honoured by the Finnish Academy of Sciences and Letters and the Estonian Ministry of Education for her publications for teachers. She has positions of trust in EU Peer Counselling tasks, Finnish National Audition of Education, Finnish National Agency for Education and with Ministry of Culture and Education in Finland.

    AbstractTitle: Teacher collaboration in school transitions
    Throughout educational systems around the world, school transitions are causing both stress and stimulation for teachers and children. Effective school-level policies and teacher collaboration practices to smooth the discontinuity of transition from preschool to primary school and from primary to lower secondary school are the focus of this presentation. A variety of activities, which build and strengthen relationships between significant contexts are suggested as the primary means to smooth the school transitions by the multiprofessional personnel (e.g. teachers, special teachers, and school psychologists). Successful teacher collaboration in Finnish school transitions are characterized by frequent contact, agreed-on curriculum goals, and a focus on supporting the child’s learning. The results of the positive connections between these supporting practices and children’s later school achievement are based on longitudinal First Steps Study data of 2000 children and their teachers.

  • Dr LI Qiong
    Director and Professor
    Institute of Teacher Education
    Faculty of Education
    Beijing Normal University
    China

    Director and Professor
    Institute of Teacher Education
    Faculty of Education
    Beijing Normal University
    China

    BiographyQiong Li is Professor of Education at Center of Teacher Education Research, Beijing Normal University. Her research interests focus on teacher education and professional development, teachers’ lives and work. She is currently Chairperson of the Institute of Teacher Education.

    AbstractTitle: Beyond the paycheck: Chinese rural teacher well-being and the impact of professional learning and local community engagement
    This paper proposes a theoretical framework to understand the structure and determinants for rural teacher well-being, with a focus on key factors that can mediate low pay and poor work conditions, specifically teachers’ professional learning and community engagement. This framework was tested using structural equation model in a sample of 3155 rural teachers in China. The quantitative results confirmed a second-order factor structure for teacher well-being, evidencing the significant impact of pay satisfaction and the mediating effects of professional learning and community engagement of rural teachers. Implications encourage policymakers to strengthen rural teacher well-being by enhancing professional learning and community connections, while seeking ways to improve pay and work conditions.

  • Dr Margaret LO
    Assistant Professor
    Division of English Language Education
    Faculty of Education
    The University of Hong Kong
    Hong Kong, China

    Assistant Professor
    Division of English Language Education
    Faculty of Education
    The University of Hong Kong
    Hong Kong, China

    BiographyMargaret Lo is an Assistant Professor in the Faculty of Education, The University of Hong Kong in the Division of English Language Education. Her teaching and research focus is on teacher education for social justice, and her most recent work is on youth mentoring as critical service-learning. She is the academic coordinator of the BABEd English programme, and has taught courses on multiliteracies and critical pedagogy, sociopolitical issues in English language education, and English language teaching pedagogy.

    AbstractTitle: Voices of protest: Hong Kong student-teachers’ activism and teacher education for social justice
    Hong Kong-born student-teachers on an undergraduate teacher preparation programme participated in the Umbrella Movement streeet protests in 2014 and the related Mongkok civil unrest in 2016. One student-teacher was arrested, convicted and imprisoned. Giving voice to three of these student-teachers, this paper examines teacher knowledge as ethical and political, and, in occupying streets and being incarcerated, as lived and embodied experience. Critical narratives in which each participant explored the educational meanings forged from their activism and how these have shaped their current practices as teachers were gathered through interviews and dialogic written reflections. Their narratives were interpreted through critical social theories and psychoanalytic thinking on ethical subjectivity. The findings highlight the interconnections between activism and pedagogy, as related to the political and ethical subjectivity of both the student-teacher and teacher educator. The paper suggests that activism has an important place in teacher education for social justice.

  • Professor Anne M. PHELAN
    Professor
    Department of Curriculum and Pedagogy
    Faculty of Education
    University of British Columbia
    Canada

    Professor
    Department of Curriculum and Pedagogy
    Faculty of Education
    University of British Columbia
    Canada

    BiographyAnne M. Phelan is a Professor in the Department of Curriculum and Pedagogy, at the University of British Columbia, Vancouver, Canada. Her research focuses on teachers’ intellectual and political freedom and on the creation of teacher education programs and policies that support that end. She has written about the dynamic of judgment and responsibility, the paradoxes of autonomy (creativity and resistance) and the anxiety of obligation in professional life. Recent publications include Teacher Education and the Political: The Power of Negative Thinking (London: Routledge, 2017; with Matthew Clarke); and Curriculum Theorizing and Teacher Education: Complicating Conjunctions (London: Routledge, 2015).

    AbstractTitle: Renewing Teacher Education in Canada: History, Place and Circumstance

    Co-authors: Anne M. Phelan (Presenter) and William H. Pinar, University of British Columbia
    Nicholas Ng-A-Fook and Ruth Kane, University of Ottawa

    The first two decades of the new millennium have witnessed unprecedented appraisal, analysis and policy formulations related to teaching and teacher education across the western world. Teaching is defined in terms of universal competencies and teachers are rendered interchangeable in a global education system characterized by uniform practices including outcome-based curricula and standardized testing. It is vital that educators imagine alternatives to the homogenization of educational experience that globalizing policies install. To this end, Canadian scholars are reimagining teacher education in terms of a) teaching as a learned profession with responsibility for the intellectual growth of the young and continuing study by teachers, b) teachers as interpreters of national cultures and protectors of forms of particularity within civic communities, and c) teachers as exhibiting moral conduct and resolve amidst conflicting and sometimes demoralizing political demands. In my presentation I will examine the foregoing themes of a Canadian contribution to a global educational challenge.

  • Professor Anna-Maija POIKKEUS
    Professor
    Department of Teacher Education
    Dean
    Faculty of Education and Psychology
    University of Jyvaskyla
    Finland

    Professor
    Department of Teacher Education
    Dean
    Faculty of Education and Psychology
    University of Jyvaskyla
    Finland

    BiographyAnna-Maija Poikkeus is Professor of Early and Primary Education (Educational psychology) at the Department of Teacher Education, University of Jyvaskyla, Finland. Her research foci include children’s learning paths and learning difficulties, student motivation and engagement, classroom interaction, social adjustment and peer relations. She has participated as co-Pi and PI in large-scale follow-up studies (Jyvaskyla Longitudinal Study of Dyslexia; First Steps Study) and in a teacher intervention (Preventing disengagement in classroom context). She is currently Dean of the Faculty of Education and Psychology, and participates in collaborative networks of the Finnish National Agency for Education, and National Doctoral School of Education.

    AbstractTitle: Does teacher knowledge feed to or lead to quality of pedagogical practice?
    Teacher change towards dialogical sharing of knowledge both among teacher and students and among colleagues requires joint reflection about meanings, values, beliefs and practices. In constructing and renegotiating their identity at times of change teachers – and teacher students – may need to experience cognitive dissonance and question their personal beliefs about teaching and learning. Framing and negotiating professional identity entails reflection of how one personally thinks about being a teacher, and taking a stand concerning the roles and meaning of pedagogical content knowledge and content knowledge in one’s professional work. Observing and sharing one’s practices in a supportive community has been found to be a powerful tool for increasing teacher pedagogical awareness and promoting agency. Of interest are ways in which changes can be achieved in knowledge structures feeding into quality of teacher practice, in particular, pedagogical practices facilitating educational dialogue and productive co-construction of knowledge in the classrooms.

  • Professor Field RICKARDS
    Dean Emeritus
    Melbourne Graduate School of Education
    The University of Melbourne
    Australia

    Dean Emeritus
    Melbourne Graduate School of Education
    The University of Melbourne
    Australia

    BiographyField Rickards is Dean Emeritus of Education at the University of Melbourne. He completed 13 years as Dean of the Melbourne Graduate School of Education in July 2017. He was first appointed to the University as a lecturer in audiology in the faculty of Medicine in 1973. As Dean of Education he guided the transformation of the Faculty of Education to a Graduate School, and has reformed the professional training of teachers through the clinical Master of Teaching program which develops graduates with the capabilities to meet the needs of individual learners.

    AbstractTitle: Towards teaching as a true clinical practice
    A new Master of Teaching teacher education degree was introduced in 2008 at the University of Melbourne as part of a university wide curriculum reform. We were convinced by the notion that teaching be recognised as an ‘academically taught, clinical practice profession’ (Teachers for a New Era, 2001), a view that challenged the enduring ‘apprenticeship’ model of teacher preparation. Graduates would be ‘interventionist practitioners, capable of using evidence to identify and meet the needs of individual learners’. Three key components are identified as central to characterising teaching as a clinical practice profession: a focus on student learning and development, evidence-informed practice, and processes of reasoning that lead to decision making. Developing and aligning the thinking of teacher education staff at the university and partnership schools, ensuring coherence across the entire curriculum, embracing new thinking and ensuring the graduate attributes had been achieved were some of the challenges that will be discussed.

  • Professor Mirja TARNANEN
    Professor
    Department of Teacher Education
    University of Jyvaskyla
    Finland

    Professor
    Department of Teacher Education
    University of Jyvaskyla
    Finland

    BiographyMirja Tarnanen is a Professor of Language Education at the University of Jyväskylä (JYU), Finland. Her research has focused on literacy and assessment practices across the curriculum, learning in multilingual settings and the development of teacher education. In the current project, she is focusing on the development of pre- and in service teachers’ professional agency. She has been a leading member of team in charge of an extensive phenomenon-based curriculum reform for teacher education at JYU. She holds positions of trust in, for example, the Ministry of Education and Culture, the Finnish National Agency for Education and the Finnish Education Evaluation Centre.

    AbstractTitle: Working together to develop teacher education as a continuum
    In the midst of global and societal change and the increasing amount of multicultural classrooms, special needs, and ICT, schools and teachers are under increasing pressure, even criticism, to respond to these changes. Moreover, working in a complex and dynamic society means that teachers are expected to engage in life-long learning to develop their professional expertise throughout their career. The absence of development plans, unsupportive leaders and limited resources within traditional further education, however, have restricted rather than supported teachers’ professional development. Despite these conditions it is important to ask how to respond to these demands with a growth mindset? Current views indicate that the effective elements of a professional development program include the joint construction of pedagogical knowledge and skills in collaboration with other teachers and a learning community. This presentation critically considers whether pre- and in-service teacher education can be bridged in a novel way to create dynamic learning communities and to promote the creative expertise of teachers?

  • Dr TAY May Yin
    Principal Master Teacher, English Language
    English Language Institute of Singapore
    Singapore

    Principal Master Teacher, English Language
    English Language Institute of Singapore
    Singapore

    BiographyMay Yin is Principal Master Teacher with the English Language Institute of Singapore. She taught English Language, Literature and General Paper at the secondary and pre-university levels. She was Senior Curriculum Specialist and Assistant Director/ English Language and Literature, and Assistant Director/ Curriculum Policy and Pedagogy in Curriculum Planning and Development Division, Ministry of Education, Singapore. She was also Senior Lecturer with the English Language and Literature Academic Group, National Institute of Education, Singapore. A Fulbright Research Scholar, her research interests include language pedagogy and classroom-based assessment; school-based curriculum design, development, implementation and evaluation; teacher cognition; and teacher professional learning and the practice of teacher professionalism.

    AbstractTitle: Approaches and Practices for English Language Teacher Professional Learning in Singapore
    Is there a best way to professional development in education? What makes a model of teacher professional development? Which models of teacher professional development work best and why? What discernable attributes do such models possess? How can critical issues and considerations in teacher professional development be addressed? These questions are addressed in this paper, which discusses the approaches and practices for teacher professional development in Singapore, in particular for English Language (EL) teachers and teacher leaders. Perspectives are offered from a qualitative self-inquiry undertaken by a team of Master Teachers in the English Language Institute of Singapore into the forms of support they give to EL teacher leaders to build their Subject Content Knowledge, enhance their pedagogical practice, improve student learning outcomes, and shift their beliefs about EL teaching and learning.

  • Dr Manka VARGHESE
    Associate Professor
    College of Education
    University of Washington
    USA

    Associate Professor
    College of Education
    University of Washington
    USA

    BiographyManka M. Varghese is associate professor of Language, Literacy, and Culture in the College of Education at the University of Washington, Seattle. Her academic specialization is linguistic minority education, focusing on teacher education and access to higher education for linguistic minorities in the U.S. as well as linguistic minority education in Italy. She has published extensively in journals such as TESOL Quarterly, Journal of Teacher Education, International Multilingual Research Journal, Journal of Language, Identity and Education, International Journal of Bilingual Education and Bilingualism and Race, Ethnicity and Education as well as a number of chapters in edited volumes.

    AbstractTitle: Troubling Practice: Teacher Subjectivity and Practice-Based Teacher Education

    Co-authors: Manka Varghese and Julia Daniels, University of Washington, Seattle

    This presentation engages with practice-based approaches to teacher education which have become ubiquitous and that we claim have marginalized the relevance of teacher subjectivity. We argue that teacher subjectivity/identity has been pushed to the margins of recent conversations about teacher education – and has therefore narrowed our understanding of the ideological and practical affordances and constraints of practice-based teacher education. Teacher subjectivity/identity must be centered in teacher education and understood as fundamental to all teachers’ embodied practice. We draw from literature exploring practice-based teacher education, post-structuralist understandings of teacher subjectivity/identity, and the experiences of teachers of color to explicate the role of subjectivity/identity in shaping teaching and, therefore, in defining critical dimensions of what and how novice teachers need to learn. We draw from our experiences as teacher educators to provide examples of teacher education that centers teacher subjectivity/identity and complicates the often-assumed neutrality and universal applicability of discrete practices.

  • Dr WANG Dan
    Head of Division
    Associate Professor
    Division of Policy, Administration and Social Sciences Education
    Faculty of Education
    The University of Hong Kong
    Hong Kong, China

    Head of Division
    Associate Professor
    Division of Policy, Administration and Social Sciences Education
    Faculty of Education
    The University of Hong Kong
    Hong Kong, China

    BiographyDan Wang is an associate professor in the Faculty of Education at the University of Hong Kong. She has expertise in sociology of education with a special interest in education in China. Her current research focuses on issues of educational inequality and teachers’ work in China. Her recently publications includes The Demoralization of Teachers: Crisis in a Rural School in China (Lanham, MD: Lexington Books) and journal articles in Journal of Contemporary China, Teaching and Teacher Education, and International Journal of Education Research.

    AbstractTitle: Organizational Social Capital and Teacher Professional Learning Communities: Comparison of Rural and Urban Schools in China
    This comparative case study examines teacher professional learning communities in one rural and one urban school in China from the perspective of organizational social capital. Findings suggest that the urban school has higher organizational social capital than the rural school in three dimensions: 1) the structure of information channel, 2) expectation, obligation and trustworthiness of the structure, and 3) collective norms and effective sanction. High organizational social capital significantly contributes to the effectiveness of school-based teacher professional learning community in the urban school. These differences in social capital are largely caused by differences in school management. The urban school employs collective evaluation and attaches emphasis on work process instead of end results of examinations, whereas the rural school focuses on individualistic teacher evaluation, which encourages competition rather than collaboration among teachers. The study calls for renewed effort to reform school management in rural schools with the aim to foster higher organizational social capital for teacher professional development.

  • Dr WANG Xiaoli
    Associate Professor
    School of Educational Science
    South China Normal University
    China

    Associate Professor
    School of Educational Science
    South China Normal University
    China

    BiographyXiaoli Wang is associate professor in School of Educational Science, South China Normal University, China. Her research interests include teacher education and moral education. She tries to bridge these two fields by focusing on the attitude dimension of teacher development. As a teacher educator, she herself has devoted her attention to help student teachers reflect teaching profession through perspective of social justice. Moreover, during her cooperation with the school-based teacher educators, she has also attempted to study how the mentors make their practical knowledge explicit in their guidance of the student teachers.

    AbstractTitle: The development of novice teachers’ resilience: from the perspective of social ecosystem theory

    Co-authors: Xiaoli Wang and Shijiao Zhang, South China Normal University, Guangzhou, China

    The global-wide educational reforms bring both opportunities and challenges. Usually, novice teachers have to deal with a fresh new working environment, including heavy teaching load, class management and complicated professional relationship. They would normally encounter various problems if not well prepared for these challenges, and thus suffer the possible pressure, or sometimes even overwhelming working stress. In this connection, besides professional knowledge, teachers’ resilience is regarded as a significant aspect for keeping their passion for continuous professional development to meet with their pressure and working load. This study aims to understand the attitude dimension of teacher education, focusing particularly on teachers’ resilience. Specifically, this study will take the perspective of social ecosystem theory to illustrate the developmental mechanism of teacher resilience.

  • Professor Simone WHITE
    Assistant Dean (International and Engagement)
    Faculty of Education
    Queensland University of Technology
    Australia
    Immediate Past President...

    Assistant Dean (International and Engagement)
    Faculty of Education
    Queensland University of Technology
    Australia
    Immediate Past President
    Australian Teacher Education Association

    BiographySimone White is Professor and Assistant Dean (International and Engagement) in the Faculty of Education at Queensland University of Technology (QUT). Simone is also the Immediate Past President of the Australian Teacher Education Association (ATEA). Simone’s publications, research and teaching are focused on the key question of how to best prepare teachers and leaders for diverse communities (both local and global). Her current research areas focus on teacher education policy, teacher development, professional experience and building and maintaining university-school/community partnerships.

    AbstractTitle: Once were teachers: Examining the professional development of school-based teacher educators
    In the Australian teacher education context, classroom teachers typically have little to no professional development before being assigned a pre-service teacher to mentor and assess. The processes for selecting mentors is generally ad hoc. Many teachers are weary of having what they perceive as the extra burden of taking a pre-service teacher in times of increasing accountability and standardised testing. This has led to something of a national crisis of an under supply of mentors and schools stretched to accommodate growing numbers of pre-service teachers. Despite this situation, the school site is increasingly viewed by politicians, policy makers and principals alike as the best place to learn to teach, with increasing interest in school-based initial teacher education models. A re-imagination of the role and position of classroom teachers within teacher education is clearly required. This presentation showcases alternative models whereby teachers participated in a professional development program designed to position them as teacher educators. Examples will be provided of the positive impact their shifting professional identity had on their overall teaching, mentoring and assessment work.

  • Professor Claire WYATT-SMITH
    Director
    Learning Sciences Institute Australia
    Australian Catholic University
    Australia

    Director
    Learning Sciences Institute Australia
    Australian Catholic University
    Australia

    BiographyClaire Wyatt-Smith is the Director of the Learning Sciences Institute Australia at Australian Catholic University and Professor of Educational Assessment and Evaluation. Previous roles include teaching in secondary schools and universities, and administrative roles including Executive Dean of Education and Arts, and Dean Academic (Arts, Education and Law). She holds advisory roles in curriculum and assessment agencies in Australia and several other countries, along with Visiting Research and Teaching Professor roles including at The University of Hong Kong. She is the Series Editor for Springer’s new teacher education series, Teacher Education, Learning Innovation and Accountability.

    AbstractTitle: Graduate Teacher Performance Assessment: An intervention project at the intersection of standards, professional knowledge, and assessment

    Co-authors: Claire Wyatt-Smith, Peta Colbert and Lenore Adie

    In the last decade the benchmarking of education systems has been accompanied by the intensifying policy interest in efforts to gauge the quality of teacher education programs and to install standards that seek to specify profession readiness and career progression. In Australia, for example, referents are the Australian Professional Standards for Teachers, Graduate level (Australian Institute for Teachers and School Leaders, 2011), and National Program Standards (AITSL, 2015). In this session I outline the collaborative design of a national consortium of 13 Initial Teacher Education providers from across Australian states and territories. The purpose of this collaborative professionalism was to apply a research-based approach to trialing a common culminating assessment completed during a final year placements and collectively setting the standard expected of graduating teachers. I discuss the distinction between system and site validity in assessing teacher education graduates in school placements and provide examples of the changing conditions in the preparation of teachers.

  • Dr Lisa Yiu
    Assistant Professor
    Division of Policy, Administration and Social Sciences Education
    Faculty of Education
    The University of Hong Kong
    Hong Kong, China

    Assistant Professor
    Division of Policy, Administration and Social Sciences Education
    Faculty of Education
    The University of Hong Kong
    Hong Kong, China

    BiographyLisa Yiu is an assistant professor at the University of Hong Kong, Faculty of Education. Her equity-focused work in Asia examines issues of diversity and inclusion, as well as the impact of educational reforms on schooling— particularly the role of teachers. Using both qualitative and quantitative methodologies, her work is motivated and critically enriched by her experiences as an inner-city teacher in Los Angeles Unified School District, English-as-a-second-language teacher in China, and university supervisor in the Stanford Teacher Education Program. Her research has appeared in the China Quarterly and Harvard Educational Review.

    AbstractTitle: Developing a Confucian Model for Student Diversity: An Alternative to Multicultural Education in Taiwan’s schools
    In recent decades, educational leaders and educators worldwide consider multicultural education as the solution to increasing student diversity in individual nations. However, scholars problematize the import of U.S.-based multiculturalism to non-Western contexts. This paper thus examines the relevance of U.S. models of multiculturalism to Taiwan’s context, where teachers are responding to new forms of student diversity from cross-border marriages. Applying a constructivist grounded theory approach, preliminary findings suggest an alternative model to the U.S. multicultural model may be most appropriate in the Taiwan context; the alternative model emerges from the Confucian worldview, as teachers respond to individual learner needs through pedagogical practices that prioritize social harmony. Importantly, preliminary findings carry implications on: 1) teacher education and professional development for student diversity in Confucian Heritage Cultures, 2) the effectiveness of importing “best practices” between Eastern and Western contexts. Data emerges from participant-observations and interviews with teachers, administrators and students in one Taiwanese public school during fall 2017.